Tag Archives: ent doctor

Treating Nasal Polyps

Are you experiencing nasal blockage and difficulty breathing? You could be suffering from nasal polyps! While most are familiar with polyps that occur in the colon, polyps can appear in the stomach, uterus, and nasal cavities. Although they are concerning, nasal polyps are almost always benign. Despite this, individuals with nasal polyps should seek treatment from an otolaryngologist immediately, as they affect one’s lifestyle and can bring about infection. Typical symptoms of nasal polyps include stuffy nose, postnasal drainage, nasal obstruction, and decrease or complete loss of smell. Continue reading

Sink or Swim: Learning to Spot Swimmer’s Ear

Are your kids in and out of the pool all summer? If you find that your child is complaining about a sore or itchy ear, they might have otitis externa—better known as swimmer’s ear. Otitis can occur when water stays in the ear after swimming, creating an environment for bacteria and fungi to grow causing infection.
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Understanding Smell and Taste Loss

According to otolaryngologists, a person’s sense of smell is at its best between the ages of 30-60. After the age of 60, sense of smell generally decreases. As a result, many elderly people lose their sense of smell entirely. Women of all ages are more likely to have an acute sense of smell than their male counterparts. However, some people are born with a poor sense of smell and taste. Although premature smell and taste loss are common, they can be caused by a number of things.

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Why do children get earaches?

Earaches are one of the most common ailments that children face. Those who frequently get earaches as a child typically outgrow them as the mature into adulthood. Why is it that earaches generally don’t manifest in adults? To understand how earaches correspond with the development of your child’s ears, nose and throat, it is important to understand how a healthy and fully developed ear functions before you understand how ear infections affect your child’s ears.

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Cotton Swabs: Good or Bad?

You’ve heard the back and forth on the subject for years. Cotton swabs: good or bad? The improper use of cotton swabs can lead to severe damage and even hearing loss! So how do we stay hygienic while keeping ears healthy? Read below to find out more about cotton swabs and your ears. Continue reading

Preventing the Flu is in Your Hands

It’s no secret the best way to avoid the flu is to get vaccinated, but there are other good health habits that can keep you feeling great this holiday season. Between the flu and other seasonal illnesses, taking these preventative steps is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. Continue reading

Mouth Cancer & Chew

Many people turn to chewing tobacco as a way to cut down the harm from smoking cigarettes. However, chew and all tobacco products have a severe association with cancer, particularly cancers of the head and neck. Nearly 48,250 Americans will be diagnosed with oral cancer this year. Of these patients, only 57% will be living five years after their diagnosis. Continue reading

Nosebleeds: Anterior or Posterior?

Nosebleeds can be frightening. Luckily, most nosebleeds are not a cause for concern and can usually be managed at home. There are two different types of nosebleeds, anterior (originating from the front of the nose) and posterior (originating from the back of the nose). Continue reading

Hearing Loss and Hunting

As we covered before, approximately 1.1 billion teenagers and young adults around the globe face the risk of hearing loss. This high number comes from the increased levels of sound and noise that comes from recreational activities, like loud concerts, clubs/bars, and audio devices, like iPhones/Pods. Though we’re always telling the younger generation “hey, turn that down!” did you ever stop to think that the activities you’re involved in could have the same impact on your hearing? Continue reading

Tonsils and Adenoids: First Line of Defense

Your immune system’s first line of defense from infections is the tonsils and adenoids. They sample viruses and bacteria that enter through the mouth or nose, and so can easily become infected. While usually tonsils and adenoids are helpful in preventing more serious conditions, at times their close contact with these agents can lead to airway obstruction or recurring bacterial infections. Continue reading